Ethicon

Ethicon

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If you’ve been affected by this Physiomesh, contact us to learn how we can represent you in the Ethicon lawsuit.

Please call 1-800-701-3672 to speak to one of our trained hernia mesh team members. An attorney and a medical professional will look over your hernia mesh case and let you know what they believe the best course of action is for you. The Hollis Law Firm does not handle class actions. Each claim is an individual hernia mesh lawsuit. The specific facts of your case will determine if your hernia mesh lawsuit is compensable and to what amount. The Hollis Law Firm represents hernia mesh victims nationwide. All case evaluations and consultations are FREE, CONFIDENTIAL, and carry NO RISK or OBLIGATION. Call 1-800-701-3672 for a hernia mesh lawsuit evaluation. Follow our Hernia Mesh Lawyer FaceBook page to stay up-to-date on the latest hernia mesh litigation updates.

Introduction

There are currently 2,460 Ethicon lawsuits filed in Federal court nationwide. In March of 2017, consolidation for a Physiomesh Multi District Litigation (MDL) was requested. The Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation (JPML) heard consolidation arguments on May 25, 2017. On June 2, 2017, MDL 2782 was created and all Physiomesh cases filed in Federal court were consolidated into the Northern District of Georgia under the Honorable Richard W. Story.

There are also over 20 Physiomesh cases filed in NJ State court, which is the home of both defendants Ethicon and Johnson & Johnson. In February of 2018, consolidation for an Ethicon multi-layered hernia mesh multicounty litigation (MCL) was request. On July 17, 2018, the New Jersey Supreme Court created a MCL for all pending and to be filed lawsuits in New Jersey state court alleging injuries arising from the use of Physiomesh. The New Jersey Physiomesh MCL was assigned to Atlantic County under Judge John C. Porto for centralized management. Attorney C. Brett Vaughn of the Hollis Law Firm continues to play an active role in the New Jersey Physiomesh MCL. Lawyers at the Hollis Law Firm have filed Physiomesh cases in both the MDL and MCL, depending on the specific facts of each plaintiff’s Physiomesh lawsuit.

Physiomesh Logo

 

History of the Case

The FDA first approved the Ethicon Physiomesh on April 9, 2010. The company performed no clinical trials on the device to prove its safety and efficacy. Instead, they used the FDA’s fast-track 510(k) approval program, which requires only that the manufacturer proves their product is significantly similar to others on the market. The product is a type of netting made of polypropylene materials and is designed to be used for the repair of ventral (abdominal) hernias. The device can be thought of as a “hernia patch,” a piece of netting that the surgeon uses to stabilize the weak and stretched tissues and muscles around a hernia bulge. The netting itself is made of non-absorbable plastic filaments and is laminated between two layers of Monocryl (poliglecaprone), a material that is supposed to help reduce the risk of inflammation and facilitate fast healing. A hernia occurs when fatty tissue, an organ, or a part of an intestine squeezes through a hole or weak spot in the surrounding muscle or connective tissues. They’re commonly found in the abdomen, but may also show up in other areas, like the groin. Risk factors for hernias include being overweight, overexertion and smoking. Excess pressure in the abdomen, including pressure that occurs with diarrhea and constipation or persistent coughing and sneezing, can also increase risk. Most hernias don’t cause any symptoms initially, but they may become visible as a “bulge” under the skin. Some people may experience discomfort and pain when moving in certain ways. If the hernia isn’t causing any immediate problems, doctors typically advise watchful waiting. But if it causes pain, or if it obstructs part of the intestine, it must be repaired. There are two basic options for surgery: open surgery and laparoscopic surgery. In open surgery, the surgeon makes an incision near the hernia and repairs it using sutures and/or mesh, shoring up the weak muscles and tissues to reinforce the area and tucking the extended material back where it belongs. A laparoscopic repair surgery is very similar, but the surgeon makes a smaller incision and uses a laparoscope with a camera on it to guide his work. This type of surgery is less invasive and usually results in a faster recovery.

The Physiomesh lawsuit is against Ethicon, a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson. The Physiomesh is made from polypropylene and is intended for hernia repair. Ethicon has been battling lawsuits for years against its transvaginal mesh products, which are also made from polypropylene. Ethicon continues to deny the life-threatening complications that polypropylene causes. However, Ethicon issued a market withdrawal on the Physiomesh in May of 2016.s.

Injuries Related to Product

Patients who have been implanted with Ethicon Physiomesh and then experienced problems have reported injuries including the following:

  • Pain
  • Bleeding
  • Swelling and redness
  • Infection
  • Internal scar tissue
  • Mesh migration
  • Mesh shrinkage
  • Mesh distortion
  • Organ damage
  • Nerve damage
  • Recurring hernia
  • Required revision surgery
  • Seromas (fluid build-up)

If you’ve experienced any of these problems, we can help you seek justice as part of the Ethicon lawsuit.

Additional Literature

Is the FDA Aware that the Physiomesh is Too Weak?

Physiomesh torn in two and destroyed

  • Jun 2016: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 5724175 “When the surgeon entered the abdominal cavity, he saw where the hernia had forced its way through the center of the mesh and it split in the middle.”
  • Apr 2016: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 5613331 “Patient experienced mesh rupture that resulted in hernia recurrence.”
  • Mar 2016: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 5471668 “During the procedure, the mesh appears to have fractured in the middle of the mesh.”
  • Jan 2016: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 5344417 “After 4-5 weeks, the patient experienced violent pain which occurred after sex. The patient underwent reoperation and during the procedure it was found that half the mesh had torn and the other half adhered to the colon. The ingrown mesh part also showed adhesions. While disconnecting the mesh from the colon, the bowel was injured.”
  • Oct 2015: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 5141887 “Surgeon reported the hernia had pushed right through the center of the mesh.”
  • Oct 2015: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 5118197 “The mesh that had contact with the strap was absorbed by the visceral peritoneum and intestinal fibro saram.”
  • Sept 2015: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 5071991 “The implant showed damages (fraying mesh filaments) at the margins and 1 hole near the margin.” “One side of the mesh had broken free of the suture line and was no longer connected to the fascia. The sutures were found to be intact to the muscle and fascia. The mesh was reported to have torn away, was balled up and was near the bowel.”
  • Jul 2015: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 4908850 “The patient underwent a hernia repair [sic] and a mesh was implanted due to a linear tear in the midst of previously implanted mesh.”
  • May 2015: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 4779125 “It was discovered by the surgeon that the mesh had ripped right down the middle.”
  • Apr 2015: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 4726748 “Patient experienced bowel adhesions to the mesh and presented with bowel obstruction… the surgeon opined that they felt this was a product failure. It was reported that the surgeon will remove the mesh which had a distinct 3 cm hole in mesh through which bowel is protruding.”
  • Apr 2015: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 4672635 “During the surgery, it was found that the mesh was not visible nor could the surgeon feel the mesh. The surgeon opined it was like it was melted and torn apart.”
  • Mar 2015: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 4571551 “Patient underwent a hernia repair procedure about one year ago and mesh was implanted. The patient recently underwent a hernia revision because the mesh split in half.”
  • Feb 2015: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 4520210 “Following the procedure, the mesh had given way at the hernia defect site resulting in a recurrent hernia.”
  • Dec 2014: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 4287046 “Approximately ten days later, the patient presented with a small bowel obstruction… It was noted there was a hole in the center of the mesh and that a loop had come through.”
  • Nov 2014: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 4262657 “The patient experienced recurrent hernia with a report of feeling a burst at the place of the original hernia… the mesh was found to be properly incorporated with a tear in the top right quadrant.”
  • Oct 2014: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 4206060 “The patient returned with a hernia recurrence and the physician found that the mesh had given way where the defect was. The mesh effectively had a hole in it. The hole was visible straight through the middle of the mesh, it hadn’t stretched.
  • Oct 2014: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 4148916 “The patient experienced central mesh rupture, detected after tissue dissection, and heavy adhesions to the small intestine… The surgeon opines the hernia recurred because the mesh was too weak.”
  • Sept 2014: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 4126076 “The patient complained of increased pain over the next 4 months, she was treated with antibiotics and a ct scan [sic] revealed an increase of liquid over the hernia repair area. The patient was diagnosed with diverticulitis and a bowel obstruction [sic] and an incarcerated small bowel obstruction… There was a hole noted in the mesh.”
  • Sept 2014: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 4115333 “The surgeon found that the implanted mesh was damaged with holes in different positions.”
  • Sept 2014: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 4099678 “The surgeon opined that the mesh appeared to have incorporated surrounding the umbilicus, but the mesh was ruptured at the umbilicus.”

Physiomesh with a hole in the center and fraying

  • Sept 2014: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 4085408 “It was noted patient experienced wound dehiscence with signs of central fraying of the mesh but mesh was not broken.”
  • Jun 2014: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 3889137 “Several small holes were seen near the margin of the hole.” “During the re-operation it was noted that there was a hole in the  middle of the mesh. The small bowel was obstructed inside the hole of the mesh with necrosis. Some adhesions were noted. The patient was septic and required hemodynamic support. The mesh was removed and due to the resection of the small bowel.”
  • May 2014: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 3812512 “The patient returned because the hernia had come back. The patient underwent a second laparoscopic surgery which revealed that the mesh had burst at the site of the defect. The solution was to dissect the damaged part of the mesh.”
  • Apr 2014: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 3733591 “During the procedure, it was noted that the perimeter of the mesh was intact with sutures in the fascia and the majority of the middle of the mesh was dissolved. The surgeon removed the mesh.”
  • Jan 2014: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 3595668 “The patient experienced a recurrent hernia and underwent a reoperation. During the reoperation, the surgeon found the mesh was broken.”
  • Dec 2013: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 3523058 “Now the mesh is torn apart in the middle and the patient has heavy adhesions.”
  • Dec 2013: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 3510809 “The surgeon cleared adhesions and ommentum from the hernia defect. The mesh had incorporated well into the abdominal wall but the mesh was torn under pressure of the abdomen, allowing the viscera to re enter the former defects.”
  • Nov 2013: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 3523648 “Patient underwent a hernia repair procedure on an unknown date about one year ago. Currently, the mesh is torn apart in the middle.”
  • Oct 2013: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 3397512 “A 4 cm rupture was found at the median of the mesh… mesh was ruptured in the middle.”
  • Sept 2013: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 3327998 “The patient underwent a re-operation. During the procedure, the surgeon noted that there was a hole in the mesh.”
  • Aug 2013: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 3300946 “The patient underwent a second surgery because the hernia reoccurred. During the re-operation, the surgeon noted a defect similar to a small hole or tear in the center of the mesh.”
  • Jul 2013: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 3214452 “During the surgery, it was noted that there was a rip in the middle of the mesh.”
  • May 2013: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 3135192 “The patient presented to the surgeon [sic] with a bowel obstruction. Bowel incarceration was discovered by diagnostic laparotomy [sic] and the surgeon saw a hole in the center of the mesh. Also, part of the mesh was densely adhered to the bowel. The surgeon partially removed the mesh.”
  • Apr 2013: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 3058421 “Approximately four months post operatively, the patient experienced a recurrent hernia. A re-operation was performed. During the surgery it was noted that the mesh was torn in the middle.”
  • Mar 2013: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 3023523 “During a re-operation on an unknown date it was found that there was a large amount of exudate and a hole in the mesh. A fistula was also discovered at the time. The hole int he mesh was repaired and the fistula was surgically treated.”

Physiomesh bent. Light weight polypropylene mesh recalled by Johnson n Johnson.

Dual-Sided Coating Prevents Adequate Incorporation

Unlike all other coated hernia meshes, the Physiomesh has a thick coating on both sides of the polypropylene. If the Physiomesh is not coated on both sides, the coating easily slides off of the polypropylene. Utilizing a dual-sided coating enabled each coating to stick to the other coating and not just the polypropylene. The coating is intended to prevent the bowel from being exposed to the underlying polypropylene. Polypropylene will essentially stick or adhere to any tissue or organs in the human body. If the polypropylene sticks to the bowel, it can cause severe injuries such as a bowel obstruction. However, if a mesh is coated on both sides, the mesh will not properly incorporate into the abdominal wall. The inability of the Physiomesh to properly incorporate results in the mesh free floating and moving around in the patient’s abdominal cavity. Hernia recurrence, severe pain, and even bowel complications are common in patients in which the Physiomesh fails to incorporate.

Is the FDA Aware that the Dual-Sided Coating Prevents Incorporation?

  • Jan 2017: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 6218126 “Two months after the procedure, the patient returned to the doctor, complaining the hernia had returned… A re-operation was performed and it was discovered the mesh pulled away from the fixations and stay sutures and migrated into a ball in the omentum.”
  • Dec 2016: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 6168117 “Following the procedure, the patient underwent a revision procedure due to recurrent hernia and the mesh was found in half down the middle where bowel was. It was also reported that abdominal wall in-growth was low compared to other mesh.”
  • Jul 2016: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 5782201 In a randomized trial “Patients experienced post-operative pain, seroma, hematoma, trocar hernia, cellulitis, hernia recurrence and mesh migration into the small bowel. As a result of the mesh migration, the patient was readmitted to the hospital with an enterocutaneous fistula. The patient was treated with mesh extraction and segmental small bowel resection.”
  • Jun 2016: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 5717602 “Incorporation of the mesh into the abdominal wall was poor, and the mesh was easily detached. The patient also experienced pain postoperatively at seven days, one month, three months, and/or six months.”
  • Apr 2016: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 5612626 “The mesh fell off into abdominal cavity and adhered to bowel loop.”
  • Dec 2015: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 5305994 “Ten days post-op, the patient returned with bowel obstruction and revision surgery was performed. During the re-operation, the surgeon used the tip of suction to swipe across the adhesion/omentum, the mesh fell easily into the abdominal cavity and was removed.”
  • Nov 2015: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 5250319 “During the re-operation, the doctor noticed that the mesh was completely unfixed in the patient and essentially balled up. The surgeon opines that the coating on both sides of the mesh is inhibiting tissue in growth.”
  • Sept 2015: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 5071911 “The surgeon states his patient experienced rupture, no integration and severe adhesions.”
  • Aug 2015: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 5029640 “The physician opined that fascia side of mesh had zero incorporation.”

Clear Physiomesh

Coating on both sides of the Physiomesh

Coating Does Not Protect the Bowel from Adhesion Formation

Our hernia mesh lawyers learned something very significant from the Physiomesh; it takes less inflammation/irritation for adhesions to form between the mesh and the bowel than it does for the mesh to incorporate into the abdominal wall. Adhesions and incorporation are describing the same process, the development of internal scar tissue, occurring on opposite sides of the mesh. The bowel is much more sensitive than the abdominal wall, and as a result, scar tissue forms easier between the mesh and bowel than the mesh and abdominal wall. This was something that initially surprised both our hernia mesh attorneys and our medical experts. It intuitively makes sense that the bowel would be more sensitive to scar tissue formation, but somehow it’s something that’s not been previously studied. Regardless, the physician adverse event reports to the FDA supply all the necessary evidence.

Is the FDA Aware that the Physiomesh’s Coating is Ineffective?

  • Apr 2017: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 6465145 “Six weeks later the patient was sent to pain management due to continuing serious pain. In 2014 the patient was rushed to er due to incarcerated loop of small bowel within ventral hernia and the mesh… Patient has been on disability since 2012 and had to go to pain management for seven years.”
  • Jan 2017: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 6264418 “Within a week or two after the procedure, the patient was seeing a doctor for abdominal pain. In 2016, the patient developed severe abdominal pain after eating and ct scan of abdomen showed a partial small bowel obstruction. The patient was admitted for observation and treatment with hydrated iv antibiotics. Five days later the patient required exploratory laparotomy. Surgical findings were acute and chronic inflammation, multiple adhesions, hemorrhage and ischemia in the small bowel. During the open bowel resection, ninety centimeters of small bowel was removed. The patient was on pca dilaudid for four days. Weight loss was twenty five pounds…. The patient is still not feeling well with episodes of vomiting.”
  • Oct 2016: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 6057564 “Hospitalization was prolonged for the patient who possibly developed severe complications requiring operation. During reoperation, loose adhesions of the greater omentum to the upper edge of the mesh and tangential to its surface were found.”
  • May 2016: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 5650261 “Six months after surgery, the patient experienced severe stomach pains… it was noted that the small intestine was stuck to the mesh.”

Physiomesh weakening in the middle

  • Apr 2016: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 5585136 “An inflammatory exudate, gelatinous in appearance, was noted to be hanging from the mesh implant during the laparoscopy. It was also reported that beneath this exudate there was a small bowel with adhesions.”
  • Feb 2016: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 5419904 “Patient experienced serious adhesions, partly impossible to remove, particularly those with ingrowth of the small intestine, left side mid-abdomen. Approximately three cm long dense adhesions was found between jejunum loop and mesh with kinking and stenosis. The defect size was off site of the mesh with clear mesh shrinkage. The was solved by segment resection and partial mesh resection. The patient underwent resection of the small intestine and terminal colostomy reconstruction.”
  • Nov 2015: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 5204983 “The re-operation revealed adhesion of bowel on the previously implanted mesh.”
  • Oct 2015: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 5166167 “During the procedure, the omentum majus was found firmly adherent on the mesh. Relatively low adhesions were found to the peritoneum… mesh was detached form the omentum and the coating from the mesh was partially separated, because it strongly adhered to the omentum.”
  • Jul 2015: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 4894918 “Multiple adhesions in loops, adherence and perforation of the small intestine in two places. The mesh was removed… The patient was sent to the ICU…receives daily dressing changes, is fasting and on total parenteral nutrition and antibiotics. There is no forecast for hospital discharge… The surgeon opined that the patient had a generalized infection and died.”
  • Jun 2015: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 4841461 “In the beginning of 2014, the patient became severely ill with symptoms of a bowel obstruction, severe nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, cramping and bloating. The patient experienced numerous hospitalizations and weight loss of 45 pounds as of 2015.”
  • Feb 2015: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 4528325 After 12-18 months “the patient experienced significant pain, over and above what was expected immediately post op and for the following 4 days, before being released from the hospital… the majority of the mesh was covered with adhesions.”
  • Nov 2014: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 4242516 “In 2013, the patient presented with severe abdominal pain out of proportion to the exam and erythema over the anterior abdominal wall. A ct scan confirmed an incarcerated small bowel with obstruction. The patient underwent a procedure for a mildly ischemic bowel within an incarcerated hernia severely stuck to mesh, resulting in a enterotomy requiring resection.”
  • Sept 2014: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 4115778 “The second day after the surgery the patient developed adhesions to the intestinal loops and was admitted with septic shock and a distended abdomen with a peritoneal reaction. A laparotomy was performed. The surgeon found corrosion of the loops and perforation of the small intestine… The intestinal fistula was surgically closed and the patient was hospitalized in the intensive care unit… the patient is currently in a coma… septic shock, possibly originated by the fistula and the patient passed away.”
  • Sept 2014: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 4076714 “During this open procedure, the previous mesh was found adhered to the small bowel. The surgeon removed parts of the mesh, lysed the adhesions and then removed the bowel from the mesh. The enterotomy was performed as the adhesiolysis created a defect in the jejunum intra-operatively.”
  • Sept 2014: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 4060962 “Small bowel obstruction which the surgeon opined was caused by adhesions of the mesh. The surgeon took down the adhesions with blunt and sharp dissection.”
  • Aug 2014: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 3979789 “Four months following the procedure, the patient experienced enterocutaneous fistula and bowel perforation which drained fecal matter without exposure of mesh.”
  • Feb 2014: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 3633903 “Three weeks later, the patient underwent a re-operation to remove the mesh because it was joined to the bowel loops.”
  • Jan 2014: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 3546474 “Patient underwent a revision surgery because the mesh had grown into the intestines.”
  • Dec 2013: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 3526920 “The mesh was removed due to incarceration of the bowel.”
  • Nov 2013: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 3467114 “The surgeon noticed that the mesh was completely into the bowel with extremely severe adhesions and fistula.”
  • Oct 2013: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 3434975 “A lap-assisted small bowel resection of a piece of small bowel adherent to devascularized omentum which was adherent to the abdominal wall near the left edge of the mesh was performed.”
  • Sept 2013: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 3335298 “During the surgery, the surgeon noted that the mesh was adhered to the bowel.”
  • Aug 2013: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 3300504 “The patient had to undergo a second operation and it was noted that a dense amount of adhesions had formed in the center of the mesh. The adhesions were removed and the mesh was replaced.”
  • Jul 2013: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 3216551 “Patient experienced a recurrence of the hernia with massive adhesions.”
  • Jun 2013: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 3159978 “It was also noted that there were strong adhesions present. The adhesions were dissected.”
  • May 2013: Physiomesh FDA Adverse Event Report MDR# 3097130 “Mesh was adhered to the bowel loops. The mesh was removed at the time and a jejunostomy was done.”

Physiomesh Folded on Center Stripe

Prone to Folding Over After Center Stripe Degrades

Medical device manufacturers are also obligated to inform the FDA when studies or literature reveal complications or defects in their products. In November of 2015, Ethicon reported a literature review to the FDA. In the study, a patient experienced bowel complications after being implanted with the Physiomesh and “adhesions were found on the majority of the mesh surface. Recurrence presented in the long [axis] of the mesh in the line of the stripe built into the mesh… It was opined by the study authors that recurrence occurred at the time point the stripe underwent degradation. It was also opined by the study authors that stiffness of the mesh in the long [axis] could be an independent factor causing recurrence.”

Packaging Prone to Micro Perforations and Tears

Package of the Physiomesh with Holes in it

The Physiomesh utilizes a foil package to keep the hernia mesh sterile. The foil packaging of the Physiomesh is prone to excessive wrinkling, which weakens the sterile packaging and allows micro perforations to form. The small holes that form in the sterile packaging of the Physiomesh are extremely hard to detect and greatly increase the risk that a surgeon implants a contaminated medical device. As a result, high rates of infection have been observed with the Physiomesh. As can be seen in the photos, the holes in the packaging of the Physiomesh are difficult to detect until the packaging is held up to a light source. With the packaging defect being so hard to detect, it’s surprising that so many adverse events have been reported on this specific defect.

Physiomesh package with visible holes

Is the FDA Aware that the Packaging of the Physiomesh is Prone to Micro Perforations?

November 2013: Coated Mesh for Hernia Repair Provide Comparable Intraperitoneal Adhesion Prevention.

5 types of hernia mesh were studied for 90 days. Overall, uncoated polypropylene performed significantly worse, resulting in more adhesions. Coated meshes resulted in adhesions where the sutures exposed polypropylene. Of the coated hernia meshes, the C-Qur showed the weakest incorporation.

January 2013: Case-control Study of Mesh-infection after a Size Tailored Hernia Repair with C-Qur V-Patch.

The study was stopped prematurely because of an unacceptably high rate of C-Qur hernia mesh infections. The full results of the study have never been published. The authors anticipated conducting a new study to look back at the over-all incidence of infection associated with Atrium’s C-Qur V-Patch. To date, the authors have not released any additional findings related to Atrium’s C-Qur hernia mesh.

Should the FDA Recall the Physiomesh?

After reviewing all of the above information, what do you think? Was the FDA justified in allowing Johnson & Johnson and Ethicon to conduct a market withdrawal instead of recalling the Physiomesh? Remember, a market withdrawal is only appropriate if there is no evidence of a defect. If you think that the FDA should have recalled the Physiomesh, let us and everyone else know by sharing this page on social media and commenting that the FDA should recall the Physiomesh on our Physiomesh YouTube video. Additionally, call your state representatives and other elected officials, and ask them why the FDA is protecting Johnson & Johnson instead of the public. The FDA must be reformed or the American public will lose even more faith in our medical industry.

Physiomesh Device Tags (Product Stickers)
Product Identification Tags for Ethicon's Physiomesh

The hernia mesh device tags are necessary to prove which hernia mesh was utilized during an operation. It is not uncommon for an operative report to use a generic name instead of the brand name when describing a hernia mesh. Many surgeons use the name of a company’s original polypropylene mesh to describe any hernia mesh made by that company. For instance, some surgeons will call all Ethicon hernia meshes “prolene” and all Bard Davol hernia meshes “marlex.” There are so many new hernia meshes constantly coming to the market that many surgeons can’t even remember which one they are implanting.

Device tags are not always easy to locate. Some hospitals do not maintain or include device tags as part of the medical record chart. At times, it is necessary to contact the surgical department directly. Obtaining medical device tags can be a frustrating and time consuming process, luckily the Hollis Law Firm has staff trained and experienced in tracking down medical device tags.

Device tags are also known as “product stickers” and the “Product Traceability Label.” The device tags note that Ethicon is the manufacturer of the Physiomesh. This particular Physiomesh was 15x20cm. The PHY1520V is the catalog number (also known as the reference number), which is used for when ordering a particular Physiomesh. The expiration date for this Physiomesh was October, 2014. This Physiomesh’s LOT number was EM8DDQA0. The LOT number corresponds to a group of Physiomeshes that were manufactured at a particular location at a particular time. LOT numbers are useful in determining if a product defect is an isolated incident or a systemic problem. The Physiomesh’s defects are a systemic problem.

Johnson and Johnson’s subsidiary Ethicon withdrew all LOT numbers of the Physiomesh from the market. The Hollis Law Firm’s Physiomesh lawyers are reviewing injuries associated with all Physiomesh LOT numbers.

Physiomesh: Ethicon Hernia Mesh Lawsuit

Please call us to speak to one of our trained hernia mesh team members. An attorney and a medical professional will look over your Physiomesh case and let you know what they believe the best course of action is for you. The specific facts of your lawsuit will determine if your lawsuit is compensable and to what amount. The Hollis Law Firm represents hernia mesh victims nationwide. All case evaluations and consultations are FREE, CONFIDENTIAL, and carry NO RISK or OBLIGATION. Call 1-800-701-3672 for an Ethicon Physiomesh lawsuit evaluation.

Physiomesh lawsuits are starting to mount across the nation. Many attorneys have finally realized that the Physiomesh is a defective hernia mesh. The hernia mesh lawyers at the Hollis Law Firm understand that the problem is larger than just Physiomesh. Visit our general hernia mesh lawsuit page for more information on other hernia meshes. Follow our Physiomesh Lawyer FaceBook page to stay up-to-date on everything Physiomesh.

Content Created By:

C. Brett Vaughn RN, BSN, JD

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